How to Care for a Temporary Crown

If you need a dental crown, you will most likely have to have a temporary dental crown before the permanent one can be placed. This is because lab-fabricated dental crowns are custom- made for your smile and can take two or more weeks to make [1]. You don’t want to be left without a tooth during this time—which is where a temporary dental crown comes in.

You may need a temporary crown if you’re getting a dental implant, root canal, bridge, or a broken tooth repaired. Temporary crowns help protect your tooth and allow you to chew and smile until your permanent crown can be placed.

Temporary crowns also help reduce tooth sensitivity to keep you comfortable while you’re waiting for your permanent crown. Here’s how to best care for your temporary crown to ensure it stays put until your next dentist visit.

Don’t Chew or Bite on the Temporary Crown If Possible

If you can, don’t chew on the side of your mouth where the temporary crown is. Although your dentist used a special type of cement to put the crown in, it’s still not as durable as your permanent crown will be. To protect the temporary crown, be mindful when chewing and try to avoid using the crown to bite or chew, especially if you’re eating crunchy or firm foods.

Avoid Hard, Sticky, or Tough Foods

While your temporary dental crown is in place, it’s important to avoid foods that could dislodge the crown. These include hard, sticky, or tough foods—think sticky candies such as caramel, crunchy breads, popcorn, nuts, crunchy fresh vegetables or fruits, gum, and tough meats. Wait until after your permanent crown is placed before enjoying these foods again!

Gently Brush and Floss—But Avoid Electric Toothbrushes

It’s important to still brush and floss your teeth while you have a temporary dental crown, and yes, you should still gently brush and floss your crown. However, if you normally use an electric toothbrush, you may want to switch back to a manual one for brushing your temporary crown, as it allows you to be gentler on your smile.

When flossing, avoid pulling the floss down when removing it from between your teeth. Instead, try pulling the floss out of the side of your tooth when you’re done to avoid any irritation or potentially disrupting your temporary crown [2].

Contact Your Dentist If the Crown Comes Off

If you have any issues with your temporary dental crown, or if your crown becomes loose or even falls out, don’t wait to call your dentist, and don’t try to make it until your appointment for the placement of the permanent crown.

The temporary crown is there for a reason—to protect your tooth and ensure your smile is ready for the permanent crown. Be sure to keep your appointment for having your final dental restoration placed so you can get your beautiful smile back!

Sources:
1. https://jada.ada.org/article/S0002-8177(21)00616-4/pdf
2. https://ufhealth.org/dental-crowns

Summary
How to Care for a Temporary Crown
Article Name
How to Care for a Temporary Crown
Description
You may need a temporary crown if you’re getting a dental implant, root canal, bridge, or a broken tooth repaired. Temporary crowns help protect your tooth and allow you to chew and smile until your permanent crown can be placed!
Author
Aldie Family & Cosmetic Dentistry