What Causes Gum Recession?

Gum recession happens when gum tissue begins to pull back from the teeth where your teeth meet your gums. You may notice that your teeth are more sensitive, look longer, or you may even see exposed tooth roots.

There are a few reasons why you may have receding gums, and all of them are typically signs that you need to change something about your oral care or your dental health to protect your teeth and gums. Gum tissue helps hold teeth in place, covers tooth roots, and plays a vital role in your tooth longevity.

Here are the top causes of gum recession you should know about!

Harsh Tooth Brushing

If you brush your teeth too hard, you’re not just damaging your tooth enamel. You may also be irritating your gum tissue, which can cause it to pull back from the teeth. Aggressive tooth brushing combined with a stiff-bristled toothbrush can cause even more damage to teeth and gums [1]. It’s best to stick with a soft-bristled toothbrush and brush teeth gently to remove plaque, which can also help protect your gum health.

Gum Disease

One of the primary causes of receding gums is gum disease. In gum disease, plaque and bacteria can cause inflammation and infection in the gum tissue. As the condition progresses, pockets of infection can form between the tooth roots and the gums, which can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth. Receding gums is one of the main symptoms of gum disease, so if you notice this issue, it’s time to follow up with your dentist [2].

Misaligned Teeth

Having misaligned teeth can make it harder for the gum tissue to stay in place. Crooked or crowded teeth can be difficult to clean, increasing your risk for gum disease and gum recession [3]. Misaligned teeth can also put undue pressure on the gum tissue, which may put you at greater risk for receding gums as well. Crooked or crowded teeth aren’t just an aesthetic concern—they can affect your overall dental health.

Teeth Grinding

Teeth grinding, also called bruxism, may affect your risk for receding gums. Teeth grinding puts enough pressure on the teeth to cause fractures and chips, and can also affect your jaw, leading to issues with your temporomandibular joint (TMJ). However, many people don’t realize that bruxism also affects the gums [4]. Teeth grinding can cause gum inflammation and may accelerate gum recession in people who have gum disease.

Do You Have Gum Recession?

If you have receding gums, it’s always worth investigating the cause with your dentist. Gums are meant to protect and secure teeth, but if gum recession happens, you can have painful, sensitive teeth and even loose teeth. Don’t ignore gum recession—ask your dentist about your receding gums to discover the cause today!

Sources:
1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8229627/
2. https://www.nidcr.nih.gov/health-info/gum-disease/more-info#symptoms
3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK553375/
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4439689/

Summary
What Causes Gum Recession?
Article Name
What Causes Gum Recession?
Description
There are a few reasons why you may have receding gums, and all of them are typically signs that you need to change something about your oral care or your dental health to protect your teeth and gums. Here are the top causes of gum recession you should know about!
Author
Leesburg Family & Cosmetic Dentistry