Your Questions About Baby Teeth: Answered

Although you can’t see them yet, your child has teeth that are just waiting to emerge from beneath their gumline as soon as they are born. You’ll start to see your child’s first teeth within the first six months to the first year of their life.

Your child’s primary teeth play a crucial role in their development. These little teeth help guide their permanent teeth into place. They also allow your child to chew and speak properly, and will support their self-confidence as they grow.

We know you have questions about baby teeth—and we have your answers here.

When Will My Child Get Their First Teeth?

Each child is different, but for most children, you can expect to see their first teeth around the age of six months. Some children may get their teeth earlier, while others won’t get them until closer to their first birthday [1]. The bottom central incisors are generally the first teeth to emerge in children.

When Should I Start Cleaning My Child’s Teeth?

You can start cleaning your child’s teeth before they even have teeth. After each feeding, gently wipe your child’s mouth with a clean cloth. As soon as your child has their first teeth, you can begin brushing them with a child-size toothbrush and a tiny amount of toothpaste—about the size of a grain of rice. And as soon as your child has two teeth that touch, you can begin flossing them.

Does My Child Need Fluoride?

The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends fluoride toothpaste for children [2]. However, your child may not need fluoride quite yet, depending on their age. Fluoride toothpaste is generally not recommended for children younger than six months. Speak to your child’s dentist about their fluoride exposure at home and when to start using fluoride toothpaste for your little one.

When Should My Child See the Dentist?

Your child should see the dentist around their first birthday or after their first teeth come in [3]. This visit gives your dentist a chance to evaluate your child’s oral health, discuss fluoride, potential dental problems your child is at risk for, and ensure their tooth development is on track. It also gets your child used to the dentist early so subsequent visits go more smoothly.

Are There Any Dental Problems I Should Know About?

As soon as your child has teeth, they can get cavities, which is why taking care of baby teeth is so important. More than half of children have tooth decay in their primary teeth [4]. In some cases, parents and caregivers can transfer bacteria that cause cavities from their mouths to their baby’s through sharing utensils or kissing, so keeping your own smile healthy may just support your baby’s oral health.

When Will My Child Lose Their First Primary Teeth?

Your child should begin losing their primary teeth around the age of six. As your child’s permanent teeth come through, those baby teeth will gradually become loose and fall out. For the next few years, your child will shed all their baby teeth, and by the age of 12, they should have most of their permanent teeth in, with the exception of wisdom teeth.

More Questions? Contact Your Pediatric Dentist

Have more questions about baby teeth? Contact your child’s pediatric dentist and ask away! Your child’s dentist is there to help your little one have the best and brightest teeth throughout their childhood and support their oral care as they grow.

Sources:
1. https://www.mouthhealthy.org/all-topics-a-z/baby-teeth
2. https://www.mouthhealthy.org/life-stages/babies-and-kids/moms-guide-to-fluoride
3. https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=a-childs-first-dental-visit-fact-
sheet-1-1509
4. https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/basics/childrens-oral-health/index.html

Summary
Article Name
Your Questions About Baby Teeth: Answered
Description
Your child’s primary teeth play a crucial role in their development. These little teeth help guide their permanent teeth into place. They also allow your child to chew and speak properly, and will support their self-confidence as they grow. We know you have questions about baby teeth—and we have your answers here.
Author
Laguna Pavilion Dental